The Rapid Roof Repair Frisco Company

Roofing Replacement Company Frisco Tx

 

 

The Rapid Roof Repair Company Frisco Tx

Welcome to Rapid Roof Repair In Frisco, we are a locally owned, licensed and insured roofing professionals dedicated to providing Frisco Area residents with quality work at an affordable price. We specialize in handling all of your roof repair needs.

 

Our Frisco Roofing Contractors assist area residents with free estimates, and emergency roof repair services. If you are on a budget, we provide quality roof repairs at an affordable price.

Our Rapid Roofing Services includes :

 

Roofing Repair & Replacement Contractors In Frisco Texas

 

 

Roofing Repair & Replacement Contractors In Frisco Texas

 

Selecting the right Roofing Contractor to work on your home is a big decision. You want to be sure that the Roofing Contractor you hire can do the work proposed, will take care of your home in the process, and will maintain an adequate level of attention to your project.

Here is a 10 point check list for you to consider:

  • Get additional estimates if you feel that you are not completely comfortable (it wont hurt our feelings)
  • Make your selection based on value versus cost. Saving a few hundred dollars to inadequately treat the problem will be more expensive in the long run.
  • Is the contractor licensed and registered?
  • Does the contractor have appropriate insurance to do business and to protect your interests.
  • Do you have a detailed proposal and scope of work? Be sure that the specifications of the equipment being proposed are outlined in detail.
  • What is covered by the manufacturer’s warranty? What is covered by the contractor?
  • Make sure that the Frisco Roofing Contractor will obtain all necessary permits and project inspections.
  • Verify the contractors references.
  • Make sure you have an understanding of the time table and projected completion date.
  • Do you know who your point of contact will be for the work?
  • Call us today! We will be happy to answer any of your questions!

Our Service Areas: Richardson , McKinney , Plano, and Allen

 

Insurance Claims

 

Hail, wind and storm damage are considered an insurance loss on your homeowner’s policy. Most insurance companies will pay the entire cost, less your deductible, for replacing the roof if it is damaged. The claim is also considered a natural disaster and does not count against you for future rate increases. Rapid Roof Repair specializes in accident and weather related damage repair and replacement; including exterior roofing, gutters, siding, widows; and interior painting, sheetrock, ceiling texture, flooring, and carpet cleaning. We will help you deal with your insurance company and meet with your insurance adjuster if requested. Our involvement prevents you from getting stuck with a settlement that won’t cover your costs, or even worse, getting denied. With Rapid Roof Repair you pay no out-of-pocket expense other than your insurance deductible. We agree to accept what your insurance company will pay for the claim, including your deductible, and ensure the highest quality repair or replacement.  You may also benefit from upgrades that we typically offer as signing incentives, such as upgrading the customer from 3-tab shingles to architectural shingles at no additional charge. Our company is also the most credentialed roofing contractors, and our employees are trained to the highest standards.

 

Our Process

First, we ask that you provide us with a copy of your insurance adjusters summary report so we can review the scope of work and check all measurements to ensure all damage is fairly evaluated and reported accurately

Second, we match our contract to the work specified in the insurance adjusters summary report, including any supplements that may need to be added if the insurance adjuster missed something.

Third, we fax the signed contract to the insurance company.

Fourth, if there is a mortgage on the home, the mortgage company’s name will most likely be on the check along with yours. Most likely there will be several forms to be filled out and notarized.

Insurance Claims – FAQ

How do I know if I hail damage? My roof isn’t leaking.

In a hailstorm, most hail that hits your roof and house may be too small to cause any damage. However, a percentage of the hail may be large or irregularly shaped, which can cause severe damage that may not be readily apparent and may not start to leaking for some time. It’s best to have your roof inspected by a state licensed roofing contractor to determine if you need to file an insurance claim and have an insurance adjuster assess the total amount of damage incurred.

The insurance company withheld depreciation on my roof. Will I get that money?

Yes. Most all home owners policies cover full replacement value. The first check the insurance company gives you is the Actual Value (AV); what the roof is worth today with it’s useful remaining life. The money that was withheld is call the depreciation, or technically, the Replacement Value (RV) and will be paid to you when the work is completed or most times upon the submission of a signed contract with a licensed contractor for the work specified in the insurance adjusters summary report.

Why did the insurance company withhold depreciation?

There are two reasons that the insurance companies hold some money back. The first reason is to make sure that you get the work done. Past experience has shown them that, if they give the customer all the money up front, many people end up spending it on something else. The second reason is that they wish to make sure that you pay your full deductible. The insurance companies reason that, if you are given all the money to begin with, many people would naturally try to find a contractor who would perform the job for the dollar amount in hand. By holding a retainage amount, they can adjust the amount of the final payout based on the roofing contractor’s invoice, thus assuring that the customer does pay the deductible.

How can I avoid paying the deductible?

Legally, you can’t. Of course, a roofer in collusion with a homeowner can submit falsified invoices. However, doing so is insurance fraud. Please don’t ask us to do this.

On my paperwork, it looks like my insurance company has already deducted my deductible from the check they sent me?

When most people look at their insurance paperwork they are confused, because they think the insurance company deducted their deductible from the money the insurance company has sent them. However, the deductible is the amount that the homeowner is responsible for paying directly to the contractor. The insurance company subtracts the home owners deductible amount on the paperwork from the total amount the insurance company allows for the claim, since the homeowner will pay their deductible directly to the contractor. The balance after subtracting what the homeowner will pay directly to the contractor as a deductible, is the total amount the insurance company will actually pay for the claim.

The insurance is only paying for part of my roof, and my neighbor’s insurance company paid for their entire roof; why is my insurance company only paying for part of my roof?

No two houses receive the same amount of damage in a storm. Your neighbor may have sustained extensive damage, and you may have received none. The insurance company will only pay for the actual damages incurred. If the entire roof was not damaged, unfortunately the insurance company cannot pay for the whole roof. However, if is it border line, it always helps to have your roofing contractor inspect the roof with your insurance adjuster to accurately assess all damage to the roof. Sometimes insurance adjusters may not be able to see all the damage if they’re not able to walk on a step roof and photograph certain areas. Rapid Roof Repair ensures a helpful presence to look out for your best interest and assist the insurance adjuster if needed with damage assessment, photographs, and measurements.

Should I get several estimates?

It is always prudent to get more than one estimate. However, when insurance is paying for the work, the dollar amount of the estimate is not very important as long as it is equal to or less than the insurance company estimate. In all such cases, with Rapid Roof Repair, you will only be paying your deductible, so your cost with us will be what the insurance company pays, plus your deductible. Therefore, your decision should be based on going with the contractor that you feel most comfortable with and whom you feel will perform the best job.

What if your estimate is greater than the insurance company’s estimate?

Usually this is because of something the insurance adjuster missed in the scope of work to be completed. We can almost always work something out with the insurance company. We will submit what is called a “supplement” with documentation in the form of pictures, measurements and paperwork. The insurance company will review the supplement and upon approval, send a check for the additional monies needed to make the repairs.

 

Anti-Bug Barrier

Rapid Roof Replacement

Our experienced local roofing contractors . . .

Baiting and Trapping

We guarantee a leak free experience !

We have been on 1000’s of roofs, the leaks will not hide from us

Wall Injection

Storm Damage Repair

we can help with the added liabilities of recent storms

We Keep You Covered 

We offer full service year round operations. Our specialties include:

  •  Residential and commercial
  • Detailed roof inspections with life expectancy and  repair vs re-roof evaluation
  •  Shake & Clay tile conversions
  •  Flat roof to truss roof conversion
  •  Emergency and non-emergency leak analysis and repair
  •  Replacement of damaged or blown off shingles
  •  Flashing repair, replacement and reseal

WINTER

Winter Weather

Spring

Spring Storms

Summer

Summer Heat

Fall

Fall Problems

You’ve found your Roofing Contractor, now lets get that roof replaced !

Our longstanding work ethic and customer service has earned us the trust of homeowners, multi-family buildings, condo management companies and businesses alike throughout the Dallas/Ft Worth Metroplex.

Dont let fancy words trick you its very simple, weather its new construction or replacement, we bring the same level of excellence, craftsmanship and attention to detail. Our commitment to you is that our quality ensures that the right roof, and that the end result is a property protected against the relentless elements, virtually maintenance-free and aesthetically pleasing.

Why take the risk of Non Local Roofers when building a new home, re roofing or repairing an existing roof, choosing a contractor is a critical decision.? Our roofing company has an established history in the area was here long before the storm and will continue to fix the effects of it.

Our professional roofing crews are safety conscious, adhere to local building codes and manufacturers’ regulations, and have a competent level of framing construction, mathematics and carpentry. This type of expertise enables us to better service virtually any customers’ specific needs; from locating and repairing small leaks to roofing large projects.

We Currently Offer the Following Services

Our project managers at Rapid Roof Replacement can complete your entire project and specialize in commercial roof repair and installation, as well as all types of residential roofing, including specialty roofing systems such as exotic metal, concrete and clay tile, and even slate.

LOGO

ABOUT FRISCO

Read About The History of Frisco further here : Frisco, Texas – Wikipedia.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frisco,_Texas. Accessed 12 Mar. 2018

Frisco, Texas
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Frisco, Texas
City
City of Frisco
Flag of Frisco, Texas
Flag Coat of arms of Frisco, Texas
Coat of arms
Location of Frisco in Collin County, Texas
Location of Frisco in Collin County, Texas
Coordinates: 33°8′29″N 96°48′47″WCoordinates: 33°8′29″N 96°48′47″W
Country United States of America
State Texas
Counties Collin
Denton
Government
• Type Council-manager
• City Council Mayor Jeff Cheney

Shona Huffman
John Keating
Will Sowell
Tim Nelson
Bill Woodard
Brian Livingston
• City Manager George Purefoy
Area
• Total 62.4 sq mi (161.6 km2)
• Land 61.8 sq mi (160.1 km2)
• Water 0.6 sq mi (1.5 km2)
Elevation 774 ft (236 m)
Population (2010)
• Total 116,989
• Estimate (March 1, 2018) 173,884
• Density 2,720/sq mi (1,050.2/km2)
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
• Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP codes 75033-75035, 75071
Area code(s) 972/469/214
FIPS code 48-27684
GNIS feature ID 1336263[1]
Website www.friscotexas.gov

Frisco is a city in Collin and Denton counties in Texas. It is part of the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex, and is approximately 25 miles (40 km) from both Dallas Love Field and Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport.

The city population was 116,989 at the 2010 census.[2] As of March 1, 2018, the city had an estimated population of 173,884.[3] Frisco was the fastest-growing city in the United States in 2009,[4] and also the fastest-growing city in the nation from 2000 to 2009. In the late 1990s, the northern Dallas–Fort Worth Metroplex suburban development tide hit the northern border of Plano and spilled into Frisco, sparking explosive growth into the 2000s. Like many of the cities in the northern suburbs of Dallas, Frisco serves as a bedroom community for many professionals who work in the Dallas–Fort Worth Metroplex.

Since 2003, Frisco has received the designation “Tree City USA” by the National Arbor Day Foundation.

Since the 2011 NCAA FCS Football Championship game, Frisco has unofficially adopted the nickname “Fargo South”[5] [6][7]for the end of December and first week of January, during the five-year reign of the North Dakota State University Bison football team (who are based out of Fargo, ND.) The Bison (pronounced “Bizon” by the huge fan base) made 5 straight trips to Frisco (2011 – 2015)[8], bringing record numbers of fans with them, most of who are from Fargo. The Bison won all five appearances; and although did not return for the 2016 season, again made a return trip to Frisco for the 2017 Championship Game, which sold out Toyota Stadium[9] against rival James Madison University.

Contents

1 History
2 Geography
2.1 Climate
2.2 Major highways
3 Demographics
3.1 Population estimate
4 Economy
4.1 Corporate presence
5 Government
5.1 Local government
5.2 Education
5.2.1 Primary and secondary
5.2.2 Higher
6 Recreation and culture
7 Sports
7.1 Venues
7.2 Lacrosse
7.3 NFL
7.4 Soccer
7.5 NCAA
7.6 Baseball
7.7 Hockey
7.8 Basketball
7.9 High school sports
7.10 Others
8 Notable people
9 References
10 External links

History

When the Dallas area was being settled by American pioneers, many of the settlers traveled by wagon trains along the Shawnee Trail. This trail became the Preston Trail, and later, Preston Road. With all of this activity, the community of Lebanon was founded along this trail, and was granted a U.S. post office in 1860. In 1902, a line of the St. Louis-San Francisco Railway was being built through the area, and periodic watering stops were needed along the route for the steam locomotives. The current settlement of Lebanon was on the Preston Ridge and was therefore too high in elevation, so the watering stop was placed about four miles (6 km) to the west on lower ground. A community grew around this train stop. Some residents of Lebanon actually moved their houses to the new community on logs. The new town was originally named Emerson, but the U.S. Postal Service rejected the name as being too similar to another town in Texas. In 1904, the town’s residents chose “Frisco City” in honor of the St. Louis–San Francisco Railway. This name was later shortened to Frisco.

Later, in 1978, the first season of the hit show Dallas was filmed at Frisco’s Cloyce Box Ranch (now the Brinkmann Ranch), where the house on site was used as the Ewing family home. This house burned down during renovations in 1987, and the steel skeleton of the house still stands on today’s Brinkmann Ranch, now the largest family owned estate in Frisco.

The distinctive Frisco coat of arms is based on the St. Louis-San Francisco Railway’s logo.
Geography

Frisco is in western Collin County and eastern Denton County at 33°08′29″N 96°48′47″W (33.141263, -96.813120).[10]
[show]
Places adjacent to Frisco, Texas
Climate

Frisco is part of the humid subtropical region. It gets 39 inches of rain per year. On average, there are 230 sunny days per year in the city. The July high is around 96 degrees. The January low is 33 degrees. The comfort index, which is based on humidity during the hot months, is a 25 out of 100, where higher is more comfortable.[11]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 62.4 square miles (161.6 km2), of which 61.8 square miles (160.1 km2) is land and 0.58 square miles (1.5 km2), or 0.92%, is water.[2]
Major highways

Dallas North Tollway (Service Road is Dallas Parkway)
Sam Rayburn Tollway (Service Road is SH 121)
SH 289 (Preston Road)
US 380 (University Drive)

Demographics
Historical population
Census Pop. %±
1910 332 —
1920 733 120.8%
1930 618 −15.7%
1940 670 8.4%
1950 736 9.9%
1960 1,184 60.9%
1970 1,845 55.8%
1980 3,420 85.4%
1990 6,138 79.5%
2000 33,714 449.3%
2010 116,989 247.0%
Est. 2016 163,656 [12] 39.9%
Texas Almanac[13]
U.S. Decennial Census[14]
2014 Estimate[15]

As of the 2010 census,[16] there were 116,989 people living in Frisco, up from the previous census in 2000, with 33,714 people. The racial makeup was 75.0% White (67.2% Non-Hispanic White), 8.1% Black or African American, 0.5% American Indian or Alaska Native, 10.0% Asian, 3.3% from other races, and 3.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 12.1% of the population.

In 2000, there were 12,065 households, and 9,652 families residing in the city. The population density was 482.4 people per square mile (186.3/km2). There were 13,683 housing units at an average density of 195.8 per square mile (75.6/km2).

By 2010,[17] there were 42,306 housing units, 39,901 households, and 31,226 families. 62% were on the Collin County side and 38% in Denton County.

67% of households were married couples living together, 8.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.7% were non-families. 17.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 2.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.93 and the average family size was 3.35. 51.7% of households had children under the age of 18 living with them.

The age distribution is 33.3% under the age of 18, 4.9% from 18 to 24, 13.9% from 25 to 34, 22.5% from 35 to 44, 20.0% from 45 to 64, and 5.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33.9 years.

According to a 2010 American Community Survey[18] estimate, the median income for a household in the city was $100,868, the median income for a family was $109,086. The per capita income for the city was $38,048. About 2.2% of families and 5.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.5% of those under age 18 and 2.4% of those age 65 or over.

The median price for a new home in Frisco is $500,000, with many homes costing millions. Frisco has become one of the most sought after upscale suburbs in North Texas.

As of 2014, Frisco, Texas is the 2nd fastest growing city in U.S. at 6.5% annually.[19] In May 2017, the US Census Bureau reported that Frisco City, Texas was the second fastest-growing city in the United States. It had a 6.2% growth rate between 2015 and 2016.[20]
Population estimate

April 1, 2010: 116,989
July 1, 2013: 136,791
June 1, 2014: 140,220
May 1, 2015: 147,580
July 1, 2016: 157,090
January 1, 2017: 159,920
February 1, 2017: 161,170
August 1, 2017: 168,140
February 1, 2018: 173,489

[3]
Economy
The IKEA in Frisco
Interior of Stonebriar Mall

Like many Dallas suburbs, Frisco is accumulating many retail properties, including Stonebriar Centre (opened August 2000), a 165-store regional mall, and IKEA (opened 2005), a furniture store with an area of 28,800 square meters (310,000 sq ft). Retail establishments and restaurant chains line Preston Road, which is one of the major north-south-running traffic arteries in the city.

Frisco took a different economic track than many surrounding cities and elected to use a fractional percent of local sales tax to fund the Frisco Economic Development Corporation (FEDC) rather than DART, the regional transportation body. The effectiveness of the FEDC, whose primary purpose is to reallocate such tax dollars to commercial ventures, is a matter of public debate.

Frisco also built Frisco Square, a mixed-use development which became the new downtown. Frisco Square has about 250 rental residential units, seven restaurants, about 40,000 square feet (3,700 m2) of commercial office space and a few personal service locations. The major development in the project is the new City Hall and main library and a public commons. A Cinemark theater opened in December 2010. In 2012, a hospital, Medical City Plano – Frisco, was built north of the theater.[21]
Corporate presence

According to the city’s 2013 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report,[11] the top employers in the city are:
No. Employer No. of employees
1 Frisco Independent School District 6,190
2 T-Mobile USA 1,500
3 Amerisource Bergen Specialty Group 1,100
4 City of Frisco 1,102
5 Conifer Health Solutions 800
6 Baylor Medical Center of Frisco 642
7 Mario Sinacola & Sons 603
8 Centennial Medical Center 500
9 Oracle Corporation 500
10 Collin College 430
11 IKEA Frisco 400
12 Randstad Technologies 300
13 Kenexa, an IBM Company 300
14 Fiserv 300
15 HCL Technologies 300
Government
Local government

Frisco is a “home rule” city. Frisco voters adopted its initial “home rule” charter in 1987. Frisco residents have voted to amend the Charter two times since 1987:

May 2002, approved 19 propositions.
May 2010, approved 14 propositions.

* In May 2014, the Charter Review Commission recommended an additional 14 propositions, however these have not yet been put to a vote by residents.

The form of government adopted by Frisco is the council-manager, which consists of a mayor and six city council members elected “at-large” and a city manager. Council members’ duties include enacting local legislation (ordinances), adopting budgets, determining policies, and appointing the City Manager and City Secretary.

According to the city’s 2010 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, the city’s various funds had $227.2 million in revenues, $184.4 million in expenditures, $1,647.0 million in total assets, $753.1 million in total liabilities, and $159.3 million in cash and investments.[11]

The structure of the management and coordination of city services is:[11]
Government officials (as of 2010) City Department Director
City Manager George A. Purefoy
City Attorney Richard Abernathy
Municipal Judge Michael Drewry
City Secretary Jenny Page
Deputy City Manager Henry J. Hill, III
Assistant City Manager Nell Lange
Assistant City Manager Ron Patterson
Director of Public Safety RJ McCall
Director of Communications Dana Baird-Hanks
Director of Engineering Services & Public Works Paul Knippel
Director of Financial Services Anita Cothran
Director of Human Resources Lauren Safranek
Director of Information Technology Curt Balogh
Director of Library Services Shelley Holley
Director of Parks & Recreation Shannon Keleher
Director Development Services John Lettelleir
Fire Chief Mark Piland
Police Chief John Bruce
Economic Development Corp President
Executive Director CVB Marla Roe

The city of Frisco is a voluntary member of the North Central Texas Council of Governments association, the purpose of which is to coordinate individual and collective local governments and facilitate regional solutions, eliminate unnecessary duplication, and enable joint decisions.
Education
Primary and secondary
Liberty High School in Frisco, Texas.

Most of Frisco is within the Frisco Independent School District (Frisco ISD). Some parts extend into Lewisville Independent School District, Little Elm Independent School District, and Prosper Independent School District.

Frisco ISD has nine high schools, sixteen middle schools and forty elementary schools. All Frisco high schools compete in 5A because of the addition of 6A schools to Texas.

The Early Childhood School[22] is available for children ages three and four who meet eligibility requirements for Headstart, Prekindergarten, or Preschool Program for Children with Disabilities.

Frisco also has the Frisco ISD Career & Technical Education Center(CTE or CaTE Center), a building in which students from high schools can experience and try different careers, from veterinary work to advertising, and graphic design.[23]
Higher

Collin College, the Preston Ridge campus of the community college district, opened on Wade Boulevard in Frisco in August 1995.

Amberton University has a local campus on Parkwood Boulevard north of Warren Parkway.

In 2008, Frisco ISD opened the Career and Technology Education Center.

The University of Dallas has moved its Carrollton campus to Frisco.

UT Arlington has a professional MBA campus in Frisco.

University of North Texas core MBA courses can be taken at the Frisco campus.
Recreation and culture

The Frisco Athletic Center features 18,000 square feet (1,700 m2) of indoor aquatics elements and about 40,000 square feet (3,700 m2) of outdoor aquatic features. Some area residents refer to this as the “Rec Center” or “F.A.C.” It features exercise equipment and group exercise classes.[24]

Frisco hosts the Museum of the American Railroad, which is based out of the Frisco Heritage Museum while construction on a separate museum complex continues. The nearby Discovery Center features an art gallery, a black box theater, and the National Video Game Museum.
Sports

Frisco is home to several sporting venues, a NCAA Division I conference headquarters, a NHL hockey team headquarters, a Major League Soccer team, a junior ice hockey league headquarters, a Minor League baseball team, and an NBA G-league team. The Dallas Cowboys moved their headquarters to Frisco in 2016.
Venues
The main entrance of Dr Pepper Ballpark

Frisco is home to a variety of sporting venues. The Dr Pepper Ballpark, a 10,600-seat baseball stadium, hosted its first baseball game on April 3, 2003. It was named the best new ballpark that year by BaseballParks.com,[25] and received the 2003 Texas Construction award for Best Architectural Design.[26] Toyota Stadium, which was opened August 6, 2005, as “Pizza Hut Park”, is a 20,500-seat stadium. It is primarily used as a soccer stadium by FC Dallas, but also hosts concerts, local high school football games and college games, specifically the I-AA (FCS) football championship starting in 2010. The Dr Pepper Arena, a combination hockey and basketball venue, is the home of the Texas Legends of the NBA G League, the North American Hockey League headquarters, and a practice facility for the Dallas Stars of the NHL.
Lacrosse

On November 16, 2017, Major League Lacrosse announced it would be moving its Rochester franchise to The Ford Center at The Star in Frisco for the 2018 season. The team would be renamed the Dallas Rattlers.[27]
NFL

The Dallas Cowboys moved their corporate headquarters to Frisco in time for the 2016 NFL football season, the complex opened in June 2016. The 91-acre Dallas Cowboys project “The Star” includes the team’s new headquarters and training facilities. One of which is Ford Stadium, where FISD High Schools and the Dallas Cowboys practice and occasionally play. It is on the corner of the N. Dallas Tollway and Warren Parkway.[28]
Soccer

FC Dallas (formerly the Dallas Burn), a Major League Soccer team, who formerly played at Dallas’ Cotton Bowl, moved their home to Pizza Hut Park (now Toyota Stadium) at the corner of the Dallas North Tollway and Main Street in Frisco in August 2005. A major international youth soccer tournament, the Dallas Cup, is hosted in Frisco each year and draws teams from around the world.
NCAA

The Southland Conference, an NCAA Division I athletics organization, relocated its headquarters to Frisco in 2006. On February 26, 2010, it was announced Pizza Hut Park (now called Toyota Stadium) in Frisco would become the host of the Football Championship Subdivision (formerly NCAA Division 1-AA) championship game, formerly held in Chattanooga, Tennessee and Huntington, West Virginia. The first matchup, hosted by the Southland Conference, was played January 7, 2011.[29]
Baseball

The Texas League AA minor league baseball team Frisco RoughRiders, a minor league affiliate of the Texas Rangers, play in Frisco at the award-winning[25][26] Dr Pepper Ballpark.
Hockey

The Dallas Stars NHL team is headquartered in Frisco, and the team practices at the Dr Pepper Arena there. The Texas Tornado of the North American Hockey League had been based in Frisco since the fall of 2003, and shortly afterward the NAHL moved its main offices to Frisco. In the 2013 off-season, the Texas Tornado relocated to North Richland Hills, Texas.
Basketball

The Texas Legends, affiliated with the Dallas Mavericks, play in the NBA G League. They play at Dr Pepper Arena.
High school sports

All Frisco Independent School District’s high schools have Academic Decathlon, football, basketball, baseball, soccer, softball, volleyball, track and cross-country, swimming, golf, power-lifting, tennis and wrestling programs available for student athletes.
Others

Frisco is home of the Superdrome,[30] an outdoor velodrome. Frisco also has an Olympic-size state-of-the-art natatorium. The Frisco Baseball & Softball Association (FBSA) has been in action since its establishment in 1984. The Frisco Football League (FFL) is an organized recreational league that allows children to play football before entering football in the school district. The Flagfootball4fun Flag Football League (FF4FUN) is an organized recreational youth flag football league that is the largest NFL flag football program in Frisco.
Notable people
[icon]
This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (June 2015)

Jay Ajayi, running back for the Philadelphia Eagles
Russ Martin, (current resident) on-air radio personality
Ezekiel Elliott, (current resident) running back for the Dallas Cowboys
Dak Prescott, (current resident) quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys
David Irving, (current resident) Dallas Cowboys player.
Youtube sensation Dude Perfect Members: Coby Cotton, Cory Cotton, Cody Jones, Garrett Hilbert and Tyler Toney

Below is more histor about Frisco Tx, and a link for further reading.
“Things to Do, Dining, Shopping at the Frisco Mall – Plan a Frisco Trip.” https://www.visitfrisco.com/. Accessed 12 Mar. 2018.

History

Frisco, Texas got its start from hardy pioneers who helped settle one of America’s newest states: Texas, admitted to the Union in 1845.

Most families who came to the north Texas prairie followed the Preston Trail (today’s Preston Road), a trail that began as an Indian footpath from the Red River south to Austin. Later, the route was known as the Shawnee Trail upon which millions of longhorn cattle were driven to markets in the north. The trail followed a high ridge of white rock that provided a dry path for the cattle. A Texas State Historic Marker about the Shawnee Trail is located at Collin College’s Frisco Campus.

With all of this activity, the community of Lebanon was founded along this trail and granted a U.S. post office in 1860. In 1902, a line of the St. Louis-San Francisco Railway was being built through the area, and periodic watering holes were needed along the rails for the steam engines. The current settlement of Lebanon was on the Preston Ridge and was thus too high in elevation, so the watering hole was placed about four miles to the west on lower ground.

Early Frisco Train Image

A community grew around this train stop. Seeing the growth and opportunities, many residents of Lebanon decided to move and some even moved their houses to the new community on logs. The new town was originally named Emerson, but that name was rejected by the U.S. Postal Service as being too similar to another town in Texas. In 1904, the residents chose the name Frisco City in honor of the St. Louis–San Francisco Railway and later shortened it to its present name, Frisco.

Frisco remained an agricultural center for decades, boasting five cotton gins at one time. The population remained below 2,000 residents until a growth spurt in the 1980s foreshadowed what was to come. By 1990, Frisco’s location, its quality of life and visionary leadership contributed to it becoming the fastest growing city in the nation with a population of about 120,000 in 2011. Today Frisco’s population is over 150,000.

To learn more about Frisco’s and the North Texas area’s rich history, make plans to visit the Frisco Heritage Museum.

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